blackman-walter-10996

Rep. Walter “Walt” Blackman

Republican

House District 6

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SUPPORT

First and foremost we must take care of any victims regardless of the crime. Secondly, 80% of AZDOC is filled with drug-related inmates. These people need drug treatment and mental health programming. Not a long time in prison. Truth and sentencing do not work.

SUPPORT

80% of people are increased for non-violent drug potion charges. These people need drug treatment programs that work, not prison I would only support repealing mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenses dealing with possession and not for trafficking.

SUPPORT

I believe prosecutors have too much power when it comes to sentencing. 72% of all sentencing are plea bargains. Judges have the expertise to decide what is best for the person being changed. The prosecutor should not be Judge and Jury.

OPPOSE

Mandatory minimum sentences are the product of good intentions, but good intentions do not always make good policy; good results are also necessary. Recognizing this fact, there are public officials on both sides of the aisle who support amending some components of state mandatory minimum sentencing laws.

SUPPORT

There are currently just under 200 mandatory minimum sentences for federal crimes on the books, but only federal drug offenses are subject to an existing sentencing safety valve. At the state level, the judge should have the authority to apply the existing safety valve to sentencing for a drug crime, he or she must make the following findings:
No one was injured during the commission of the drug offense
The defendant has little to no prior criminal history
The offense was non-violent; no weapon – such as a gun – was used
The defendant was not a kingpin, leader of a cartel or other otherwise the organizer of the actual offense
The defendant cooperated with the prosecutor in providing information about the offense

SUPPORT

Pretrial diversion creates opportunities for people accused of an offense to avoid the collateral consequences of a conviction, which can be detrimental to future employment, housing, citizenship, and education, and can lead to increases in recidivism. These programs require fees and often payment of restitution.

SUPPORT

External oversight serves several critical functions. It protects the rights and well-being of incarcerated individuals, who have limited ways to defend their interests, and who frequently suffer from mental illness or addiction. It ensures that correctional facility staff have safe and sanitary working environments. And it is a proven mechanism for identifying and addressing issues before they lead to expensive litigation, media scandals, or other human and fiscal costs.

SUPPORT

In a mental health crisis, people are more likely to encounter police than get medical help. As a result, 2 million people with mental illness are booked into jails each year. Nearly 15% of men and 30% of women booked into jails have a serious mental health condition. Once in jail, many individuals don’t receive the treatment they need and end up getting worse, not better. They stay longer than their counterparts without mental illness. They are at risk of victimization and often their mental health conditions get worse. Jailing people with mental illness creates huge burdens on law enforcement, corrections and state and local budgets. It does not protect public safety. And people who could be helped are being ignored.

SUPPORT

New circumstances can make the continued incarceration of a prisoner senseless and inhumane. Aggressive cancer may suddenly leave a prisoner facing death behind bars, as James Michael Bowers’ case exemplifies. Old age may so whittle a prisoner’s body and mind that he cannot dress, eat, or bathe by himself. An accident may claim the life of a prisoner’s husband, condemning their young children to foster care when there is no family to look after them.

SUPPORT

Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid analgesic that is similar to morphine but is 50 to 100 times more potent. It is a Schedule II prescription drug, and it is typically used to treat patients with severe pain or to manage pain after surgery. It is also sometimes used to treat patients with chronic pain who are physically tolerant to other opioids. People have been known to die as a result of drug related issues when dealers are selling this on the street. It’s damgurages and lethal. dealers should be placed in prison for the distribution of this drug on the street.

SUPPORT

After decades of explosive growth, prison populations have mostly flattened. Much of that is due to lawmakers lessening penalties for drug possession or low-level property offenses. While a welcome start, a bolder approach is necessary to truly begin to make a dent in the numbers of individuals who have served and will serve decades behind bars. This approach will take political courage from legislators, judges, and the executive branch of state governments.